Incliniations on the route

Home Forums EuroTour2014: Oslo to Berlin Incliniations on the route

This topic contains 13 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Velostrada 4 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #119

    Pfriemler
    Participant

    Hello to all,

    I´m new in velomobiling (drove about 1.000km in the last 3 months) and not used to long distances rides yet.
    Because of that I`m worried about slowing down the speed of the group, especially at inclinations. In the german part of the tour there should not be to much of them, but how about the norwegian, swedish and danish part?

    Thanks for your advice!
    Alex

    #120

    Moorsauser
    Participant

    Hi Alex, we are planning on joining a s well with two persons and we are not used to long distances as well, but we will start our training before a little. Up to 200 km should not be a problem and I am looking forward to it; we are planning on going by train or transport our Milane via car (rent a bigger one with several people for example) and go on the ferry in Kiel.
    We do have to decide soon, since the prices for the ferry is going up every day….
    Hope you join as well; regards,
    Agnes

    #122

    Pfriemler
    Participant

    Hello Agnes,

    if I´m joinig the tour I`ll use the ferry from Kiel, too. Maybe there will be an “invasion” of velombiles at the ferry-terminal. 🙂

    Yesterday I found accidentally at “gpsies.com” some tour-descriptions which eventually are the base for the gpx-files in the post above 🙂 Maybe I´ve better checked that post earlier. 🙂

    I created a summary of the inclinations using the inclination-profiles at “gpsies.com”. The pdf-file is attached to this post, maybe it`s useful.

    Regards
    Alex

    #124

    Jimm
    Keymaster

    Greetings all!
    Norway and Sweden will be hilly but since we will be close to the coast much of the time, it should not be too bad – mostly rolling hills with the occasional steep climb (as seen in that PDF you posted). If our Danish leg sticks to Helsingborg->Copenhagen->Vordingborg->Gedser, then you will have rolling hills at the beginning and end, flat in the middle, with a big climb just before Vordingborg (but a nice rolling hill descent!). The start of the German leg will have some rolling hills and flat areas. Not sure about how it looks as we get closer to Berlin.

    If you can hold 20-25 kph as your average cruising speed, then you will do very well. But do not despair if you end up crawling up the hills – you will make up for it on the other side!

    My typical touring day is about 8-10 hours for 150-200 km. That is cruising around 20-25 kph and includes several stops for water/snack/toilet pauses and a healthy lunch break.

    Bear in mind this is not a race – you get there when you get there. Do not worry about how long it takes. Better to go slow and save your knees on the hills, while you enjoy the scenery. 🙂

    • my ride: 2011 Steintrike Nomad Sport with Leitra Wildcat velomobile fairing.
    • my other ride: 2004 Anthrotech Trike converted to a 4-wheeled cycletaxi
    #125

    Jimm
    Keymaster

    I do recommend starting your training *now*, however. At the least, I would suggest starting at 50-60 km once or twice a week at a minimum, then added 10 km to each ride thereafter, building towards 150 or 200 km at an average speed of 20-25 minimum. Find some long hills and learn to ‘spin’ the pedals at a steady high-rpm (70-80 rpm at least). That will save the knees when you start carrying luggage uphill.

    At the start, you should train without luggage (except water/snacks). When you are about at the halfway point until the tour (around mid- to late-April) start training *with* what you will carry on the tour. Not only does this prepare you for lugging around all your stuff, you will quickly discover things that you can live without (one ground tarp instead of two, one drinking cup instead of two, a spork instead of a separate fork and spoon, fewer sets of clothing, one universal charger instead of 3, and so on.). http://ultralightcycling.blogspot.dk/ is a good resource for ultralight cycle touring suggestions. Remember that you will be carrying yourself, your luggage, *and* a 20-30 kg velomobile.

    Get used to drinking lots of liquids, and eating quick energy foods regularly like bananas and so on while you train. Your body will adapt to the regime and when the tour starts you will not find yourself with any ‘energy dead spots’ during the day – periods where your energy feels at its lowest, where you feel like you just cannot keep going. Regular training *with* a good diet will make the ride more enjoyable.

    If you can do 150 km fully loaded at minimum average speed of 20 kph (7-8 hours including breaks), then I think you will be set for the Euro Tour. Remember you will be doing this for 8 days.

    I know it sounds like a lot, but many people under-estimated their abilities during the Euro Tour 2013 and dropped out. Lack of hydration/energy food, lack of hill training (spin quickly in low gear), lack of map-reading skills are just some of the things they had trouble with.

    • my ride: 2011 Steintrike Nomad Sport with Leitra Wildcat velomobile fairing.
    • my other ride: 2004 Anthrotech Trike converted to a 4-wheeled cycletaxi
    #126

    Pfriemler
    Participant

    Thanks Jimm for your very useful hints!

    Il start training as soon as my Leitra’s ready again for riding (doing some service at this time).

    Regards
    Alex

    #127

    Pfriemler
    Participant

    I did it:

    I booked the ferry from Kiel to Oslo, July 24th, leaving Kiel at 2 p.m., arriving at Oslo about 10 a.m. 🙂

    Regards
    Alex

    #128

    Moorsauser
    Participant

    Hi Jimm,
    thanks for your training advise;
    I will start training as soon as it gets a little warmer; I do drive regulary to work (27 km one way) and back 3 or 4 times a week, but not during winter.

    Since the area I live in is flat everywhere…….but windy, but I will extend the weekend training a lot before we leave.

    Kind regards,
    Agnes

    #129

    Jimm
    Keymaster

    …I do drive regularly to work (27 km one way) and back 3 or 4 times a week, but not during winter…

    That can often be the best time to cycle! Unless you have really heavy snow or your city just does not use snowplows effectively. Winter cycling usually means you don’t get as sweaty or hot, and have more incentive to keep moving in the cold temperatures in order to keep the warmth inside the cabin of the velomobile.

    I cycle all year around, in all kinds of weather. Typically, on any ride longer than 5 km, I’m cycling in just jeans and long sleeve shirt – the interior warms up nicely after a few minutes.

    And with winters lasting longer each year, you might not be able to afford to wait until April to train! 🙂

    • my ride: 2011 Steintrike Nomad Sport with Leitra Wildcat velomobile fairing.
    • my other ride: 2004 Anthrotech Trike converted to a 4-wheeled cycletaxi
    #130

    Jimm
    Keymaster

    I did it

    Great! Look forward to seeing you on the tour.

    • my ride: 2011 Steintrike Nomad Sport with Leitra Wildcat velomobile fairing.
    • my other ride: 2004 Anthrotech Trike converted to a 4-wheeled cycletaxi
    #131

    Thanks Jim for your kind reminder on better preparation. I shall do my best not to drop out again.

    Peter

    #133

    chris123
    Participant

    Hello everybody. I have only recently discovered this website after having followed the preparations so far on the German Velomobilforum.
    I also do not have much travelling experience. And since I only own a velomobile since last year´s January I have not covered more than roundabout 3.000 km. Plus some experience on a bent bike and a bent tricycle, make that another 500 km.
    But according to what I have experienced so far I know that it is no problem to cover 100 km on an afternoon. So a daily average of about 150 km thus covering mornings and afternoons seems not to be a goal too high to achieve.
    Of course it is a difference to cover a distance of an average 150 km once or twice or to pedal such a distance repeatedly over eight days.
    I wonder if there will arise knee problems or problems with my sinews. Jupp in his informations about GBSR has pointed toward this possibility. But I guess that if we do not push too hard it will work. Even given the inclinations on the route. And I was under the impression that the coastline was flat and the going easy.
    Greets, Christoph.

    #135

    Jimm
    Keymaster

    …I wonder if there will arise knee problems or problems with my sinews…

    If you have not had much “spin training”, now is a good time to start getting used to the technique. When you begin to encounter a hill, you start shifting to lower gears when you feel uncomfortable with the effort, but maintain your pedal spin rate/RPMs. You keep spinning at the same speed, shifting up or down to keep your effort comfortable – whatever you feel is your optimum spin rate. Many people will suggest an spin rate/RPM at the pedals anywhere from 60-90 rpm, depending on your fitness level.

    The idea is not to worry about speed, but spin rate. Think of yourself like a diesel engine in a big truck: limited range in RPM, but lots of gears! 🙂

    So, for example, if you drop below 60, you should downshift to a lower gear, and if you get above 80-90, you should upshift to a higher gear. Keeping the spin rate constant relieves pressure from your knees, and can help maintain an even effort with breathing and muscle activity.

    If you feel you are ‘mashing’ down on the pedals, then you are probably spinning too slow – time to shift to a lower gear.

    Spin technique is also great to use when you have SPD/clip-in shoes and pedals. You reduce even more stress on the legs and knees if you learn to pull and push with alternating legs as you spin. You’ll discover that hill climbing becomes much easier when you use the full pedal stroke with each leg – pushing away, then pulling towards you.

    • my ride: 2011 Steintrike Nomad Sport with Leitra Wildcat velomobile fairing.
    • my other ride: 2004 Anthrotech Trike converted to a 4-wheeled cycletaxi
    #139

    Velostrada
    Participant

    Jimm has described very well how to training for and ride uphill , it is important to bear in mind what is driving up runs down too , so a rough ride uphill is quickly forgotten when going back down with a huge smile on your face 🙂

    Driving uphill in a velomobile , will always be associated with that it’s hard. It has become somewhat of an urban legend , in particular emerging on various forums when new velomobile owners show up.

    I have also been a “newbie” , I heard the same thing , so the first while I avoided the many hills on my trips , spent a lot of unnecessary time to plan these ” hill free” routes.
    Fortunately , I started to run the easiest way , even if it meant hills, and that opened up a whole new world and a fascinating driving.

    Since we are all different , it is also different levels to train in hill driving, even when you think you have become a ” hill climbing ” the most important thing is however that you do it at a pace that suits you, and not him who run in front .
    On long trips it is best to use the energy where it does the most good: on flat roads. Save energy uphill, if possible take advantage of momenthum. Do not stop in the middle of the hill, there is also better view at the top :-).
    “Rolling hills” is pure enjoyment and joyride.

    I believe that the “fear” of Hills in a velobile is exaggerated, it’s a bit like when people fear going to the dentist, and fear for several days before when they’ve been there, and asked if it was bad, the answer is often: No.
    As velomobile driver or velonaut you need not fear the hills, enjoy the whole trip, and do not worry about the hills as a barrier, but as an experience. When you defeat them mentally, it strengthens you even when you are on the hills

    Euro Tour 2014 is roughly the same area and route, as I drove in Super Scandinavian Brevet in 2013(4 days 10.000 hight meters), but in the opposite direction. There can be seen the report and GPS data here on my website: http://www.velostrada.dk/super-brevet-scandinavia-dag-1/

    The most important thing is to enjoy the ride…Looking forward to meet You all

    / Soren http://www.velostrada.dk

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